Monthly Archives: February 2014

1889 Letter from a friend

Evergreen Place, Ayovelles Parish, Louisiana to Room 22 Hotel Dieu, New Orleans, Louisiana January 2, 1889

Mrs. Mary Williams* to her friend Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

Dear Mrs. O’Kelly,

I got home safe thanks to God for it and felt as well as can be expected. But feel the cold more than while in the city. I got home at two o’clock in the morning and after I got in bed it commence to rain and rained all day yesterday so that no one could get out.

But if it is possible I will send your plants on the next boat And I will try to send the plants I promised Sister Mary Louis And I will put Mrs. Parner’s root of violets in the same box with her name on them. May God bless you all you can not imagine how I miss you all and dear Sister Vincent I can see her cheerful face all the time.

When you receive the plants write a postal to say you got them and if you do not get them in two or three days let me know and I will send more as they are sometimes lost.

And I pray to God you may soon be well and able to be home with your family. Please give my love to Mrs. Parner. Give my love to Sister Vincent And to Sister Mary Louis And remember me kindly to Sister Mary. And also to Kate the nurse in the ward And to all who may inquire about me. Josie** sends her love to you all. And now I will say good day to you And may God bless and protect you all is the wish of your sincere friend.

Mrs. Mary Williams

*Mary Jeanette Spikes, Born June 5,1873 Louisiana Died September 28, 1943 Texas. Daughter of Fred Spikes and Elizabeth Surmons. Wife of James R. Williams

** Lily Josephine Williams, Born September 28, 1894 Ayovelles, Louisiana Died November 25, 1991 Waco, Texas. Daughter of James and Mary Williams. Wife of Floyd Elmer Nixon.

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1889 A little steamboat burned at Trenton on Sunday

Monroe, Louisiana January 2, 1889 to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans, Louisiana

William Abram O’Kelly to his wife Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

My Darling,

I did not write to you yesterday. I let Miller go to Bastrop on Monday and it has been raining ever since. A little steamboat burned at Trenton on Sunday but no one was hurt. She had just landed. *

Sonny has been helping me to clerk since Miller went off he eats his meals here.

We have had a great deal to pay this week but I will do my best to get the money there for you in time if the Sister says anything tell Tom to give you $25 and you can pay that much and keep it out when the money comes but I do not think she will be worried. I am sorry I could not send it to day. I will send it to Tom.

I was elected the delegate to the convention of the Catholic Knights of America to meet on the second Thursday in February which will be the 14th day of the month.

The children seem to be getting on tolerable well. They all moved Saturday to Uncle’s room. Boots got tired and went back early but I found the other two coiled up in Uncle’s bed fast asleep when I went home about 11 o’clock. I threatened to whip them for it but have not done so yet. I believe I will let them off this time. They have great times cooking on the little stove, last Sunday they cooked me several dinners.

The Datton’s have moved out of the old Hilton home and some one else moved in there Monday. I do not know who they are.

All send love

Your affectionate husband

W.A. O’Kelly

* The steamboat Sallie burned at the water’s edge opposite Trenton the Sunday morning of December 30th. She had on board at the time of the 250 bales of cotton, nearly all of which was destroyed.

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Filed under Georgiana Dull Van Emburgh O'Kelly, Henry O'Kelly, James George O'Kelly, Letters to Hotel Dieu, Mary Catherine O'Kelly, Thomas Swan O'Kelly, William Abram O'Kelly Sr.

1888 I try to bear it patiently

Monroe, La December 31, 1888 to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans Louisiana

Malinda Dull Van Emburgh to her daughter Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

Dear Daughter

I wrote you a few lines to let you know how all your children are. The baby is growing fast and can eat everything that we give him and does not have collic and is getting so strong Aunt Mary and I can hardly hold him when he gets mad and all the other children keep well.

I am very sorry you improve slowly but you can hardly expect to improve much in a month and expect you fret so it weakens you and that keeps you from doing so well. I so much wish I could see you to see if you are looking any better than when you left home but time goes by so fast and spring will soon be here with pleasant weather and then you can come home and if you can’t come I will go to you with all the children and stay with you on the cot or rent a house and do our own house keeping. I hope to hear from you soon and am glad and very thankful that Mrs. Kline comes to see you . If you want any fresh butter or eggs I will send you some or anything you want let me know and I will try to get it for you. Sister Martha [Martha Dull Harrison] sais she would like to see you.

Mr. Sam Powel lost his life on the boat. I am so glad the disaster did not occur when you were on board.*

Times seems so lonely with out you but I try to bear it patiently and hope you will do the same. William reads all your letters to us all and addresses all my letters for me. I hope the weather will be good and you can go out as I think that will keep your mind imployed and keep you from grieving so much about home. Hoping you are feeling better this morning. I close the baby plays on the floor a good deal and enjoys it very much. Bootsey keeps well and Jennie and Sonnie are as heavy as lead.

Your Mother

*Burning of the John H. Hanna.

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1888 We are all doing tolerable well.

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Monroe, Louisiana to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans, Louisiana December 31, 1888

William Abram O’Kelly to his wife Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

My Darling,

Your letter of the 29th to hand. You did not say anything about your feet whether they had stopped swelling or not.

I hope you enjoyed that bottle of fine wine. We are all doing tolerable well. I went hunting yesterday evening but did not kill anything. I hope you have received the box by this time. Miller is going to Bastrop to day to spend New Year he will be back the day after tomorrow. A happy New Year to you Darling. Ma  writes to you by to days mail.

Your affectionate husband

W. A. O’Kelly

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1888 I wish I could see Mamma

Monroe, La December 29, 1888 to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans

William Abram O’Kelly to his wife Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

Darling,

We received another letter from you last night and were glad to hear that you had been so long with out a back set. Yesterday was a beautiful cold day but this morning it woke up sleeting afterwards turned to rain and now it is threatening and cold. Ma took the children up town shopping Thursday evening yesterday Jennie went back and bought her a doll. Sonny seems to be the only one of the children to miss you. A day does not go by without his saying something about you or he will come up and lay his head in my lap and say I wish I could see Mamma don’t you Pop. All send love to you. I hope Tom is not going to be sick.

Your affectionate husband

William O’Kelly

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1888 Times are very dull to me

Envelope addressed to Georgiana with swatch of cloth for dressmaking included.

Envelope addressed to Georgiana with swatch of cloth for dressmaking included.

Monroe, Louisiana December 28, 1888 to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans, Louisiana

Malinda Dull Van Emburgh to her daughter Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

Dear Daughter,

William had a letter from you last night and I am glad to hear that you continue to improve but I am sorry to hear that your feet trouble you and I think if you would bathe them in mullen or soda and then rub them with flannel or mustard it would be a great relief to you. The children are all well and play all day and would play all night if sleep did not overtake them. It is after nine o’clock and all the little ones are asleep and Abe was the last one to close his bright blue eyes to night.

I will write more often now. I intended writing last night but lost my paper and could not find it until to day. I went uptown yesterday and bought Jennie and Bootsie each a dress and left them with Fannie [Francis Beasley] to make. I will send you a sample hope you will like them to be made plain with flush collar and cuffs and I will send you a sample of the flush as soon as I can get a piece. Sister Martha [Martha Dull Harrison] and [her daughter] Mattie [Martha Harrison] are streched on making Mattie a fine dress. It is treco like Jennies but not the same color mahogany. Times are very dull to me but I feel like if I could see you I would never want anything again. I am so thankful that [steam] boat [John H. Hanna] waited until another time to burn than when you were on her.

The children all wanted to write to you but Abe kept a wake so long they all had to go to sleep. They are all getting along very well and growing fat every day. He is getting so heavy I can scarcely carry him and when he gets mad he fights and is that don’t do he bites but he is the best baby you ever saw so try to be contented and try to pass the time as pleasantly as you can. I know how it is we all feel bad about it even the children have their little gloomy spells and all we can do is to wade through it as bravely as we can. If you were not sick and suffering I would not feel so bad about it. I hope you will continue to improve. It is getting late I will write soon again and write more next time.

Your Mother

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1888 I know you could not help from feeling sad on Christmas day

William Abram O’Kelly to his wife Georgiana Van Emburgh O’Kelly

Monroe, Louisiana December 28th 1888 to Hotel Dieu, New Orleans, Louisiana

My Darling

Your letter of Christmas day was received last night. I am sorry to hear that you are troubled with the swelling of your feet. You have been still so long that when you go about it causes them to swell after you walk about a while. I think that will all go away.

Those were nice cards of yours we put them away for you. We got the box yesterday. Jennie [Jane Calderwood O’Kelly] was delighted with her stool and she and Boots [Mary Catherine O’Kelly] thought the shawls were too nice for anything. Uncle [Henry O’Kelly] said he was much obliged for the tie it was just what he wanted, he could not have suited himself better. I saw Father [Ludovic] Enaut yesterday he wanted to know how you were getting on and I told him. He wanted me to tell you about our Christmas doings but I told him I had already written you about it.

You say in your last letter that you are sad now darling I do not want you to be sad or to feel lonely, but I want you to feel cheerful and happy. I write to you nearly every day so that you can hear from home and know how well thing is getting along with us. I know you could not help from feeling sad on Christmas day though because you were away from those who love you so much who are so dear to you, but darling you must think light of it and when you come home well wont we make much of you to make up for lost time. We will show our darling that she is our greatest treasure and by our love and affection we will make up for all the time that you have been from us precious and you will look back on that time with pleasure more than with regret.

We have loved each other well darling since we were married, we have not known the quarreling and bickering of many married couples. That is one reason you are sad at times. I have always tried to be kind and loving to you darling and if I have failed at times it was not of the heart but a mere caprice in our seven years of married life. I do not think I have made you cry but once and I have always regretted that time darling I will try to better and well I wont say love you more for that would be impossible for you to know that I do love you with my whole heart and soul above every thing on this earth and a woman knows when she is loved. I can not kiss you now but your letters have been touched by your hand my love and I can kiss them.

Now I do not want you to be sad or low spirited again but be happy and light hearted and think of what a happy time we will all have when you come home there we will put the big pot in the little one and have a feast to make up for the one we lost at Christmas and in our joy or sorrow we will not forget to thank God for all that he has done for us. Every day since Father Enaut bound us together I have prayed to God that we might live long and happily together seven years is a long time but it has seemed so short to me my darling wife that unless I count back it does not seem so long.

God bless you darling and make you well is one morning and evening prayer. We want to hear from you as often as possible for your letters give us a great deal of pleasure.

Your affectionate husband

W.A. O’Kelly

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Filed under Georgiana Dull Van Emburgh O'Kelly, Henry O'Kelly, Jane Calderwood O'Kelly, Letters to Hotel Dieu, Mary Catherine O'Kelly, William Abram O'Kelly Sr.